NEMLA CFP: Disability and Poetry: “Writing” the (Dis)abled Body in Poetry

Call for Papers:
Disability and Poetry: “Writing” the (Dis)abled Body in Poetry
March 17 to 20, 2016

47th Annual NeMLA Convention
Hartford, Connecticut

This panel expands the discursive space where disability matters in poetic
studies. While disability studies has been present as an active force in
literary studies for decades, there is still much discussion concerning the
category of “disability poetics.”  Many people argue that it is an activist
movement, while others believe it as an aesthetic and/or a position around
embodiment.  This panel hopes to bring scholars who are studying disability
in relation to the body, fragmentation, materiality, ablelism, and activism
as it relates to poetry to discover how the writing of the “body”
impacts “disability poetics.”   In oral tradition, there exists a long
tradition of reading poetry through the metrical body, measuring poetry
into body parts such as kōla (legs), podes (feet), and daktyloi (fingers).
This panel is interested in how this tradition resonates in contemporary
context where ideas of embodiment have become synonymous with normalcy of
bodies, sensations or agency.  Because the social process of disabling is
tied heavily to identity politics (with regard to nationality, race,
gender, and/or sexual orientation), this panel will challenge normative
ideas of the body so as to define a disability poetics that exposes the
degree to which bodies are constructed within narratives that stigmatize
physical difference.

We welcome all projects and ideas that are studying disability in relation
to the body, fragmentation, materiality, ablelism, or activism as it
relates to poetry.  Our hope is to further illustrate the broader impact of
the “body” in what has been categorized as “disability poetics.”

Please post abstracts by September 30, 2015 at
https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/participate/submit.html
(under Cultural Studies and Media Studies)

If you have any questions about submitting a proposal to this panel, do not
hesitate to contact Pearl Chaozon Bauer at pcchaozonbauer@ucdavis.edu.